LKS Medical Faculty MEHU
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MPS-HKUMed Patient Safety and Ethics Essay Prize

MPS-HKUMed Patient Safety and Ethics Essay Prize

MPS-HKUMed Patient Safety and Ethics Essay Prize

MPS-HKUMed Patient Safety and Ethics Essay Prize

This Prize was established with the support of the Medical Protection Society Limited to encourage medical students to promote patient safety, clinical risk management, and medical ethics. The Prize shall be open to MBBS students.

Each year, a total of four prizes shall be awarded, with two prizes (i.e. one to the winner and one to the runner-up) to the Junior Group (MBBS I – III students) and two prizes to the Senior Group (MBBS IV – VI students), who submit the best original essays on any of the following topics:

▪ Clinical Risks Prevention
▪ Ethics and Medical Professionalism
▪ Professional Well-being

Each essay is shared with author’s permission, with the aim of triggering an open and meaningful conversation to promote patient safety, clinical risk management, and medical ethics.

2023-24 Awardees

Winner (Senior Group – MBBS IV-VI): Kyle Hui

Do Not Conceal Your Child’s Autism Diagnosis

This essay explores the ethical implications of parents concealing their children’s autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis. It argues that non-disclosure is unethical as it limits self-advocacy, causes harm, and damages trust. Self-advocacy for children with ASD is important in obtaining opportunities to ensure an open future. In addition, the idea that  nondisclosure protects children from social stigma is challenged, as concealed stigma can cause distress. Finally, non-disclosure causes the breakdown of trust between patients, family, and healthcare providers, impeding management. There is a need for transparency about ASD diagnoses, with healthcare professionals providing support to parents in navigating these conversations.

Runner-up Prize (Senior Group – MBBS IV-VI): Chan Yu Kiu Elkie

Knowledge is not the sole culprit of poor hand hygiene compliance: What factors affect it and what evidence-based interventions exist?

Hand hygiene is the cornerstone of infection control in hospitals. However, compliance with hand hygiene recommendations, including among medical students, has been difficult to achieve. This review examines the factors that contribute to poor hand hygiene practices among medical students and presents evidence-based strategies to mitigate risks. It highlights factors other than the lack of knowledge, including convenience, and behavioral preferences. Predicated on the assumption that factors apart from knowledge influence hand hygiene compliance, it recommends interventions such as clinical scenarios and reminder mechanisms. By adopting these strategies, healthcare workers can create a safer environment.